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Tuesday, July 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali found in the catalog.

Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali

Kotacheri Madhava Krishna Sarma

Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali

by Kotacheri Madhava Krishna Sarma

  • 256 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Sri Lal Bahadur Shastri Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth in Delhi .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pāṇini,
  • Kātyāyana,
  • Patañjali

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesSanskrit Vidyapeeth prakashanmala, 4
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPK519 S26
    The Physical Object
    Pagination185p.
    Number of Pages185
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17446934M

      Amongst the more important authors called Patañjali are: The author of the Mahābhāṣya, an advanced treatise on Sanskrit grammar and linguistics framed as a commentary on Kātyāyana's vārttikas (short comments) on Pāṇini's Aṣṭādhyāyī. Before the emergence of the formalized philosophical systems or the darśanas, we see a number of philosophical issues relating to language implicitly and explicitly brought out by the early Sanskrit grammarians, namely Pāṇini, Kātyāyana and Patañjali. Pāṇini ( bce) composed his grammar of Sanskrit with a certain notion of Sanskrit as an atemporal language.

    The Mahābhāṣya (“great commentary”) of Patañjali on the Aṣṭādhyāyī of Pāṇini is a major early exposition on Pāṇini. Kātyāyana’s work (nearly vārtikas on Pāṇini) is available only through references in Patañjali’s work.   Again, Kātyāyana is found to say in his vārtika on the Pā. Sū. , jātyākhyāyāmekasmin bahuvacanamanyatarasyām, that it is the dravya that is expressed by the term jāti. Patañjali also endorses Kātyāyana’s view and says in the Mahābhāsya thereon: jātiśabdena hi dravyamapi abhidhīyate jātirapi.

    /peuh tun jeuh lee/, n. fl. late 2nd century B.C., Indian scholar and philosopher: sometimes regarded as the founder of yoga. * * * Hindu author, mystic, and philosopher also called Gonardīya, or Gonikāputra flourished 2nd century BC or 5th. In this 26th Gonda Lecture, Madhav Deshpande considers the changing religious connections that developed over time within the tradition of Pāṇinian grammar. With Pāṇini's grammar being treated as a Vedāṅga-Vyākaraṇa, several religious themes permeate the works of Kātyāyana and Patañjali. Was Pāṇini an Ācārya or a R̥ṣi?


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Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali by Kotacheri Madhava Krishna Sarma Download PDF EPUB FB2

• The author of the Mahābhāṣya, an ancient treatise on Sanskrit grammar and linguistics, based on the Aṣṭādhyāyī of Pāṇini. This Patañjali's life is dated to mid 2nd century BCE by both Western and Indian scholars.[5][6][7] This text was titled as a bhasya or "commentary" on Kātyāyana-Pāṇini's work by Patanjali, but is so revered in the Indian traditions that it is widely known simply as Maha 5/5(1).

Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali are regarded as the three sages, munitrayī or trimuni, of the classical Indian linguistic sciences. According to the principle of yathottaraṃ munīnāṃ prāmāṇyam, each succeeding sage is accorded more authority, allowing for a self-correcting tradition which regards Patañjali as the high point.

Works. He is known for two works: The Vārttikakāra, an elaboration on Pāṇini grammar. Along with the Mahābhāṣya of Patañjali, this text became a core part of the Vyākaraṇa was one of the six Vedangas, and constituted compulsory education for students in the following twelve centuries.; He also composed one of the later Śulbasūtras, Pāṇini series of nine texts on the Era: Vedic period.

Patañjali’s work is widely accepted as “the first ever serious attempt to present a successful theory of linguistics, especially grammar.” Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali are regarded as the three sages, munitrayī or trimuni, of the classical Indian linguistic sciences.

According to tradition, the same Patañjali was also the author of the Mahābhāṣya, a commentary on Kātyāyana's vārttikas (short comments) on Pāṇini's Aṣṭādhyāyī as well as an unspecified work of medicine (āyurveda).

The Varttika, an elaboration on Pāṇini grammar. Along with the Mahābhāsya of Patañjali, this text became a core part of the Vyākarana (grammar) canon. This was one of the six Vedangas, and constituted compulsory education for students in the following twelve centuries.

This text was titled as a bhasya or "commentary" on Kātyāyana-Pāṇini's work by Patanjali, but is so revered in the Indian traditions that it is widely known simply as Maha-bhasya or "Great commentary".

So vigorous, well reasoned and vast is his text, that this Patanjali has been the authority as the last grammarian of classical Sanskrit for 2, years, with Pāṇini and Kātyāyana preceding him.

Kātyāyana (c. 3rd century BC) was a Sanskrit grammarian, mathematician and Vedic priest who lived in ancient India. He is known for two works: The Varttika, an elaboration on Pāṇini grammar. Along with the Mahābhāsya of Patañjali, this text became a core part of the Vyākarana (grammar) canon.

Patañjali's writings also elaborate some principles of morphology (prakriyā). In the context of elaborating on Pāṇini's aphorisms, he also discusses Kātyāyana's commentary, which are also aphoristic and sūtra-like; in the later tradition, these were transmitted as embedded in Patañjali.

Patañjali is one of the three most famous Sanskrit grammarians of ancient India, other two being Pāṇini and Kātyāyana who preceded Patañjali (dated to c. BCE). Kātyāyana 's work (nearly vārtikas on Pāṇini) is available only through references in Patañjali 's work.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Kielhorn, Franz, Kátyáyana and Patanjali: their relation to each other and to Pānini. Varanasi, Indological Book House [].

The development of Sanskrit from Panini to Patanjali [Sarangi, A. C] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The development of Sanskrit from Panini to PatanjaliAuthor: A. C Sarangi. The author of the Mahābhāṣya, an ancient treatise on Sanskrit grammarand linguistics, based on the Aṣṭādhyāyīof Pāṇini.

This Patañjali's life is dated to mid 2nd century BCE by. According to tradition, the same Patañjali was also the author of the Mahābhāṣya, a commentary on Kātyāyana's vārttikas (short comments) on Pāṇini's Aṣṭādhy- yī and of an. These books are books contributed by the community.

Click here to contribute your book. The Aṣṭādhyāyī of Pāṇini, translated by Śrīśa Candra Vāsu and formatted by James Roger Black --texts. eye Topics: Sanskrit language, Sanskrit grammar, Pāṇini, Patañjali, Kātyāyana, Aṣṭādhyāyī.

पाणिनि, कात्यायन (pāṇini, kātyāyana) and पतञ्जलि (patañjali) who were the pioneers of that system; cf. मुनित्रयं नमस्कृत्य (munitrayaṃ namaskṛtya) Siddhanta-Kaumud beginning. Patañjali (Devanāgarī पतञजलि) (fl. BCE or 2nd c. BCE) is the compiler of the Yoga Sutras, an important collection of aphorisms on Yoga practice, and also the author of the Mahābhāṣya, a major commentary on Pāṇini's Ashtadhyayi.

However, it /5(3). The yoga philosophy of Patanjali by Anthony Elenjimittam (Book) Pāṇini, Kātyāyana, and Patañjali by K.

Madhava Sarma (Book). Patañjali (Sanskrit: पतञ्जलि, is the compiler of the Yoga Sūtras, an important collection of aphorisms on Yoga practice.

According to tradition, the same Patañjali was also the author of the Mahābhāṣya, a commentary on Kātyāyana's vārttikas (short comments) on Pāṇini's Aṣṭādhyāyī as well as an unspecified work of medicine (āyurveda).

Since Pāṇinīyam (Pāṇini’s grammar) is based on the trio of Sūtra, Vārtika and Bhāṣya of Pāṇini, Kātyāyana and Patañjali, it is called “Trimuni Vyākaraṇam” (Grammar of the three sages). Defects – of Body, Speech and Mind. In the history of the Indian grammatical tradition, Bhartṛhari (about fifth century C.E.) is the fourth great grammarian - after Pāṇini, Kātyāyana and Patañjali - and the first to make the philosophical aspects of language and grammar the main subject of an independent work.In addition to Pāṇini's work, three other works – all related and closely dependent on the Aṣṭādhyāyī – need to be mentioned with respect to grammar.

They are the vārtikas by Kātyāyana or Vararuchi, the bhāṣya by Patanjali, and the rearrangement into chapters by Bhattoji Dīkṣita in the form of Siddhāntakaumudī. Amongst the more important authors called Patañjali are: The author of the Mahābhāṣya, an advanced treatise on Sanskrit grammar and linguistics framed as a commentary on Kātyāyana's vārttikas.